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Books & Chocolate

I love to read just about anything, as long as it's fiction. I read for me - that means I read what I want, when I want. My reviews tend to mostly be based on how I'm able to personally connect with the story/characters. They are not intended to influence someone to read, or not read, a particular book. I always encourage people to take a chance and make up your own mind.

 

Oh, and I love chocolate.

Glass Sword

Glass Sword (Red Queen) - Victoria Aveyard

Ugh. I was hoping this book would get better for me than the first. Based on some reviews, I knew there was a risk it wouldn't, but a girl can hope, right?

 

Mare started out in the first book as kind of a badass. Then by the end of book one, she turned a bit whiny. Now, at the end of book two, she's basically just a cold-hearted bitch. I'm struggling to find any sort of redeeming quality for her. Yeah, she's young and been through a lot - I get that she might snap a few times and say something insensitive. But we're in her head, so it's her thoughts too. She turns on everyone - all because Julian, who she knew for only a short period of time, once told her that 'anyone can betray anyone' (and we hear that statement ALL THE FREAKING TIME). She apparently trusts what this Julian says more so than her family or Kilorn who she's known her whole life and continues to stand by her even though she shits on him all the time. Julian must have been right because Maven, the guy she didn't really know and was betrothed to out of force, betrayed her. Sure, that makes perfect sense for why she wouldn't trust the people who have been by her side from the beginning. What??

 

And I'm seriously missing why Mare is treated as the most important person in existence, by both sides. I could understand why Maven would be obsessed with getting her back under her control -- except for the fact that he tried to kill her. So if he wanted to control her why wouldn't he have done that from the start? 

 

And it was way too long. By like 200 pages. Maybe more. Just a lot of nonaction and thoughts from Mare which were the same thoughts on every other page. 

 

Ugh. I'm taking a break from this series. There's one more out right now, and I think there's a 4th coming. I hope that will be the last one. I don't know yet if I'll finish out the series. I sort of don't really care at this point.

Gracefully Grayson

Gracefully Grayson - Ami Polonsky

This is the first book I've read with a transgender character, so I don't have much to compare to. That said, I thought the book was very well done. Grayson is a 6th-grade boy who identifies as a girl on the inside. It's intended for younger readers, however, I think adults can also gain from reading it. 

 

One of the things that struck me throughout the story was how much this was on Grayson's mind. It was in every thought - from what clothes to wear, to what pen to use, to what bathroom to use, and ultimately to what role to audition for in the school play. It consumed Grayson's mind, and that's no way for anyone to live, especially a child. 

 

This book covered what I'm guessing are the high points of a child trying to emerge through a different gender - from bullying to lack of understanding in his family to support from some unexpected people. I loved the way Grayson's teacher Finn handled the situation, as well as the mother of one of the other children who befriends Grayson.

 

There is one thing that struck me about this book that I struggle with -- it seemed as though Grayson's primary way of identifying as a girl was based on liking princesses, wanting to dress in skirts/sparkly clothes, liking pink, wanting braided hair, etc. I don't personally know anyone who is transgender, and as I said above this is my first book on the subject, so maybe these things are the primary identifiers. If that's the case, then I wish our society could get to place to just let all that go. I mean, the only reasons dresses and princesses and sparkly things are associated with girls is because our society has decided that's the way it should be. I guess I feel that if we accept it's OK for girls to wear pants and play football and 'do anything a boy can do', then why don't we have the same expectations for boys? Why does someone have to feel incomplete or defective just because they like something that society has told them they shouldn't like? As Grayson's little cousin said, "Why does it matter?" If only we could all be as accepting as young children.

 

I feel as though people who identify with the opposite sex they were born to experience more conflict than just these things, but that's what this book focused on so that's what I had a reaction to. To me, boy and girl should simply refer to the physical body of a person. If you have certain parts, you're a girl. If you have the others, you're a boy. What you like and what you want to wear should not be defined by those labels.

 

This is a book I intend to have my 11-year-old read -- and discuss with her afterward. 

A Fatal Grace

A Fatal Grace - Louise Penny

I liked this book marginally better than the first. I was used to the style of the audiobook narration, so maybe that had something to do with it. I also felt the characters were a bit more developed this time around. 

 

I was able to figure out who had killed CC - I had a few working theories, but my top one turned out to be correct. While I'm not loving the series, I'll continue to follow along with my book club as long as I can get the audio version from my library. 

By Your Side

By Your Side - Kasie West

While this wasn't my favorite Kasie West book to date, it was still an enjoyable read. I appreciate that she tried to tackle an anxiety disorder in this book with the main character, Autumn. I also liked how Autumn eventually realized she was often making choices to please other people, rather than because it was what she really wanted. 

 

I just didn't feel these characters had as much depth as some of those in her other books. I also had to reach pretty far to accept how Jeff ends up reacting to the whole situation. 

 

Regardless, Kasie West is still an author I intend to read and follow - especially when I need a light, feel-good story.

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel - Neil Gaiman

I can see how The Ocean at the End of the Lane would be a thing of magic to many readers. It's certainly well written and imaginative. And I didn't feel as though it was incomplete despite the short length. This was my first book by Gaiman, so I wasn't sure what to expect.

 

While I did enjoy the story, I couldn't really connect with it and I'm not sure why. I think there are layers upon layers here that I just wasn't able to uncover. I listened to it on audiobook and I'm wondering if that was part of the issue. Gaiman does a fabulous job of the narration, but I don't always fully engage in audiobooks so I might have missed a few of the hidden gems as a result.


I think I may try to read this one again (and read next time rather than listen) at a later date to see if I come away with a different perception. 

Still Life

Still Life - Louise Penny

I'm in an online book group that started this series, and I decided to follow along since my library has the audiobooks available for loan. I have too many books on my list to read these, but listening to the audiobooks don't put me out at all. I hadn't heard about this series prior to my club selecting it, but the descriptions sounded interesting so I jumped on board. 

 

Well, I was in danger of dropping the first book, Still Life, after less than an hour of listening. It's very rare for me to chuck a book to the DNF bucket, especially so soon after starting, so I slugged forward to finish it. It wasn't a long audiobook, so I figured I should be able to get through it quickly even if I wasn't enjoying it. 

 

The biggest issue was the narrator's style. I enjoyed his voice and cadence, but there are no pauses or breaks between shifts of PoV. I was so lost before I got used to it! I listen to my audiobooks while doing something else (driving, gardening, laundry, etc.) so my attention isn't always 100% on the book. Add the two together and this book started off as a hot mess for me. I did have to go back a few times to catch something or figure out if I missed a PoV shift, but it wasn't as annoying as I thought it would be. 

 

The characters were enjoyable. While I liked the variety we were given, it did feel a bit as though the author used a checklist of sorts to make sure all the bases were covered - one black, two gays, one mean old bat, a couple quirky artists, unruly teens, annoying bitch, etc., etc., etc. Some readers have commented that the characters become more developed in the future books, and I'm hoping that's the case. Many felt defined by typical stereotypical behaviors, and if that continues I'll just get annoyed. 

 

I liked the focus on art and bow hunting/archery. Those are areas I personally don't come across often in books so it was a refreshing plot path. I'm also not sure I've read any books set in the Quebec area, so I really enjoyed being somewhere new to me.

 

I felt the mystery was fairly well done. While I did guess correctly early on who killed Jane, and how they would figure out who did it, I didn't have the why part figured out. It did feel a bit rushed/convenient, but I'm willing to give a bit of fictional leeway there. 

 

I'll stick with the series for now. I'm hoping that I don't feel frustrated or lost so early on now that I'm used the narrator's style.

Red Queen

Red Queen - Victoria Aveyard

I'm still trying to figure out how I feel about Red Queen. I had high hopes based on many of the reviews, and I'm wondering if that's what left me a bit ambivalent. On some level, I expected more than what I felt. 

 

One of the primary reasons I didn't connect more with this book was the main character, Mare. She started off strong for me. While she had the expected 'I don't give a shit' attitude found in many similar YA books, I liked how she strove to be independent. I liked the way Mare found her way into the royal circle and how she discovered her abilities. We did see one hint of her ability prior to this (which was good) but I do wish there had been more hints prior. The way it is makes it seem as though it was just dumb luck that her abilities showed up at the right time. But as the story progressed, she became somewhat inconsistent for me. I like when a character grows throughout a book or series, but that's not what happened here. For example, she hated Cal for his role in the death of so many Reds and how he could torture Reds with only the slightest hint of guilt, yet she didn't show much remorse for the deaths she had a hand in or the people she used along the way. It was a classic double-standard -- it's not OK for it to happen to the Reds because they are the oppressed society, but it's totally fine for it to happen to the Silvers because they must all be the same and take from the Reds and abuse them along the way. 

 

I also didn't like how Mare was the girl all the guys fell in love with. That YA trope is starting to get old for me. It just makes the character unrealistic. Someone has to dislike her (other than the jealous girls and the evil mother) so that leaves me as the reader to dislike her. And not for good reasons that make me still enjoy the book.

 

I have to admit that I looked ahead at the book description for the second and third books of the series. I wish I hadn't done that because it spoiled the twist at the end. Had I not looked ahead, I think I would have been surprised by the twist. So I have to give credit for that being well done. 

 

I liked the book well enough to continue with the series -- hopefully they get better for me or at least stay on the same track as the first book.

Thirteen Reasons Why

Thirteen Reasons Why - Jay Asher

Going into the book, I knew Thirteen Reasons Why was a controversial book. I have personally battled depression in the past, but have never been near suicidal. So while I can't comment on the authenticity of how this story represents the mindset of someone who is suicidal, I can certainly believe that it rings true to at least some people. I watched the Netflix series as well, and there were differences. There were parts I thought played out better in the book and others I thought were more impactful in the series. I'll focus on the book here.

 

Hannah isn't a particularly likable character. In some ways, I'm glad for that though. The reader has to work a bit harder to maintain empathy with the narrator, and working harder for it makes you think a bit more about the circumstances. 

 

I don't think this book had anything that was a profoundly new concept. As I read through each of the 13 reasons, I had a memory flash of when something similar happened to me growing up. Things for teens may be more pronounced these days with the inclusion of social media, but it's not new stuff. Kids are cruel - always have been and always will be. Those cruel words and actions will have an impact on others. Some will get over it and some won't. Some will even be able to use it to make them stronger. I do think it might be more difficult to escape these days from cruel behavior because of how easily rumors and bullying can spread through social media, and I know that can be a real challenge. So even though not a profound new look at the struggles of teens, it's a unique way to bring forth the reminders that if we could all just be a bit kinder then we might actually make a huge impact in someone else's life. 

 

I do wish the book would have gone more into Hannah's mental health. Many kids go through similar experiences, yet they don't commit or even attempt suicide. Someone who is willing to carry it through has much deeper needs - and unfortunately the book didn't touch on that at all. 

 

I'd also like to point out that this is the kind of book that parents should read with their child. Some have slammed this book for the danger it causes because it glamorizes suicide and somewhat gives a pass as to why it's OK. Some will see it that way. Others won't. That's why it's important to read it with your teen and talk about it. 

Behind Closed Doors

Behind Closed Doors - B.A. Paris

I'm not exactly sure of the reason, but I could not connect to Behind Closed Doors at all. I didn't feel a thing for any of the characters or what happened to them. It wasn't a thriller for me. The plot isn't very plausible, but I was willing to look past it so my lack of connection wasn't from that. I wish I could put my finger on it, but I'm now even having a difficult time remembering details - that's how little I connected with this book. At least it was a quick read and a free loan from the library - so not much lost in the way of time and money. I'm sure there are those out there who will really enjoy this book. I just wasn't one of them.

Winter

Winter - Marissa Meyer

Winter is the final installment of the Lunar Chronicles series. I'm so happy this final book didn't let me down. While I did feel it was a bit longer than it needed to be (lots of filler with repetitive information), I thought it was a satisfying ending to the story that remained true to the series as a whole. This book did get a bit more into the romances of the characters, but that was a bit expected. And it didn't really overshadow the 'defeat Lavana' plot -- but I think that also contributed to the extra length.

 

Overall I highly recommend this series if you're looking for a fun, feel-good story with strong female leads.

The Trespasser

The Trespasser: A Novel - Tana French

After the letdown of book #5, The Secret Place, in the Dublin Murder Squad series, I wasn't sure if I wanted to continue on with book #6, The Trespasser. I'd been struggling with the slow pace of all the books in the series, and the main character in The Trespasser was a character I didn't care for in the previous book. But I decided to push forward since at the time of this review book #6 was the last. I'm glad I did, as this book was so much better than the last.

 

First, I should point out that the pacing in this book was much better, at least for the last half of the book. The first half still had a bit of the dragging quality, but the second part really read quickly. Or I suppose it's possible I've just gotten better at knowing which parts I can skip in these books :)

 

While I was hesitant to be in the PoV of Detective Conway, I was ultimately glad for it. Conway didn't come across as a likable character in the previous book, and if I'm being honest she still isn't, but I do have a better understanding of why she is so negative. As the only female detective, Conway has to take a lot of crap from her fellow detectives. She feels trapped - if she stands up for herself she is treated as an outcast, but if she accepts the mistreatment then she's condoning the behavior. I mostly liked the way Conway was able to see the situation from a different perspective - I say mostly because I do wish she had had a bit more self-awareness in the moments when she would act in a way that made her complaints come across as a double-standard (like it's OK for her to poke a sexual joke at a male colleague, but not for them to poke one at her).

 

I liked the way that Conway and Moran worked together. I think in many ways Moran made Conway more human and therefore forgivable for some of her actions. 

 

I'm glad the author didn't go the supernatural route in this book the way she did in the previous. If that had been in there, it would have been just the nail I needed to close up on this series for good. I thought the mystery was well played and I liked the way it all tied in together and the ultimate resolution.

 

I'm not sure if there will be future books in this series, but if so I'm good to give the next one a go.

 

 

Big Little Lies

Big Little Lies - Liane Moriarty

Big Little Lies kind of took me by surprise. Obviously, I was hoping I'd like it, but I worried it would end up disappointing me like many books hyped in the media. Also, I had read two other books by Liane Moriarty and they were only so-so for me. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. 

 

I enjoyed all the characters, even the ones I didn't like. I also liked the way Moriarty added interview notes from the characters to the start/end of most chapters. It was a unique way to not only drive the plot forward, but it also gave me additional insight into each of the characters. 

 

I have to say, most murder mysteries don't shock me. I usually figure out the who-done-it by mid-book or at least have a few options which one turns out to be correct in the end. I did not see this one coming and I literally let an "Oh crap" slip out :) 

 

Very well worth the read, with lots of characters and situations I could relate to.

The Secret Place

The Secret Place - Tana French

The whole Dublin Murder Squad series has been a bit of an up-and-down ride for me. There have been things I've really enjoyed (which is what has kept me reading the series), and things I didn't. One of my continued criticisms is the pace - the books are soooo slow. This one and the previous were a bit faster, but still - snail's pace. 

 

Where to start with the issues I had with this one... Well, I already mentioned the pacing so there's that. While it was a bit quicker overall, there were moments when it just bogged down. 

 

Then there was the back-and-forth bit. It took me a while to figure out that the chapters were actually bouncing from the past to present. And that the past chapters were third-person omniscient. The present day chapters were third-person limited, so the switch was really jarring at times - even towards the end when I knew that was the style being used. 

 

I suppose next I'll mention the characters. I didn't connect with a single one of them. I really didn't care what happened to any of them. I've said before I don't have to like characters in books to enjoy the book, so that's not the issue. It's just there was no connection at all. Just indifference. 

 

Finally - the whole supernatural element was not necessary. In the previous books, there was always a hint of a supernatural element. I was OK with that. But this was obvious. I wish the author had just stayed in the vague territory on that one.

 

One more book to go in the series (at least as of the date of this post). I'll tough it out, even though the two main characters are the same as this story - and remember I didn't care about either of them...

Cress

Cress - Marissa Meyer

So far, Cress is my favorite of the Lunar Chronicles. I have to say I have a bit of a book-crush on Thorne. He is just so freaking adorable! And match him with the quirky personality of Cress... ahh (insert big sappy grin emoji)

 

Really, this book was just so much FUN! I can't tell you how many times I giggled out loud - which rarely happens to me while reading!

 

I've been pleasantly surprised by this whole series. It's been a long time since I haven't been let down by the subsequent books. I've been listening to these on audiobooks downloaded from my library. The narrator does a fantastic job, but I'm enjoying them so much and want to share them with my daughter when she gets a bit older, so I'm just going to have to purchase the box set for the personal bookshelf :)

 

Let's hope I didn't just stick my foot in my mouth and jinx it for the final book, Winter. I hope it doesn't fall short of the other books for me!

Scarlet

Scarlet - Marissa Meyer

I really enjoyed Scarlet, the second book in the Lunar Chronicles series. I thought this adaption of Little Red Riding Hood was very creative. I liked both Scarlet and Wolf and how they fit into the overall story from the previous book. While the relationship between Scarlet and Wolf is more on the insta-love side of the spectrum, I'm OK with it so far because Scarlet does question the logic of it and holds back.

 

The only real issue I had with the book was the fact that Scarlet was so easily 'controlled' by the Lunars. This became more of an irritation after getting into the next book, Cress, because it's explained that those who are weak minded are the easiest to control. Scarlet did not come across as weak minded to me. And we saw in Cinder how Kai was able to fight against the 'glamor' (with much difficulty), so we know it can be done. I guess it felt like the control over Scarlet was more plot driven than character driven, and I wish it was the other way around.

(show spoiler)

 

I'm really enjoying this series so far and can't wait to share them with my daughter in a year or so.

Everything I Never Told You

Everything I Never Told you - Celeste Ng

Everything I Never Told You is a slow paced book that is more a character study and lesson in life than a story. The Lee family is a mixed Chinese American family set in the 1970's. The story starts with the discovery that the middle child, Lydia, has gone missing and is soon found at the bottom of the nearby lake. Lydia was the family favorite, so the book shows how the family unravels in a variety of ways.

 

There are many things I really liked about this book. It does show the power communication can have. If any of these family members would have talked to one another, it's likely none of this would have ever happened. It shows how easy it is for people to assume we know our loved ones just because they are family and we see them every day. Especially between parents and children. It's easy for parents to assume we know what our children are feeling or what they want because we were once their age. So they must be going through the same things we went through, and many times we would do anything to keep them from experiencing the same painful moments we had to go through. And sometimes we end up doing more damage as a result.

 

However, there were a few dull spots for me. For one, I didn't really feel as though I connected with any of the characters. I didn't like the parents, Marilyn and James, and of the children, Hannah was probably the only one I felt sorry for. She's the one who is essentially ignored - the 'oops' kid that no one wanted to begin with. While I felt all the characters held realistic issues, I didn't feel they were all that realistic. For example, Hannah came across as very wise for a 10-year-old. I have a 10-year-old, and I'm pretty sure she wouldn't come to the conclusion that

Jack loved Nath just because he licked the drop of water that fell from Nath's back and landed on his hand.

(show spoiler)

 

The other issues I had were along similar lines - the Lee family never talked to each other about any of their true feelings. Everything was false or left unsaid. Then, suddenly, each realizes the 'truth' of the situation (not what happened to Lydia or why, but that everything in their lives was false). It comes to them in a flash, triggered by something mundane. I can see where these instances might make them question their beliefs, but I don't see how they could suddenly be so spot on about their reality.

 

I felt another miss was that the mother never acknowledged that she made a choice in her life. She wanted to be a doctor, but fell in love and got pregnant. She could have still been a doctor but chose to pursue a family life. Granted, I know that given the setting of the story that was much more unlikely back then than it is now, so I do get that she would feel somewhat slighted. But it was still her choice to sleep with James, and apparently not use protection. The whole story we are told how much she feels she settled for what she was 'supposed' to do. Then she has an aha moment when she opens her eyes and really stops to think about the fact that her neighbor, who is a single mom, is a doctor. That's what makes her think she can still be a doctor - but what I don't get is that she leaves her family to finish her degree. Why wouldn't that moment make her realize she could still pursue the career and stay with her family, especially since she had a husband to support/help her where the other woman did not? To me she came across as a selfish one-dimensional woman who could only define happiness as anything that was the opposite of what her mother had been.

(show spoiler)